A Soldiers Blog
 

A Soldiers Blog
 
War blogs! Support Our Troops Care Packages! Breaking NEWS! Live chat site dedicated to Fort Sill Oklahoma III Armored. Keep Your Helmet On!
 
 


A Soldiers Blog
Message Board
MILITARY CARE PACKAGES
100's Newspapers
Driving Records
Blogs Of War
Fort Sill OK
ABC News
CNN
Reuters
Credit Reports
BBC Online
Lawton-Constitution
MSNBC
Fox News
NEWS9 Oklahoma
Dear Abby Program
How To Support Our Troops
Military Care Packages
Accurate Information Services
A Soldiers Blog
People Finder
100's Newspapers
War Blogs
Blogs Of War
Fort Sill OK
Blog Photos
Salon
Yahoo
Credit Reports
BBC Online
Lawton-Constitution
Blog Garb
Fox News
Live Free Chat
Leave A Blog


" May No Soldier Go Unloved "

   
 
Saturday, December 20, 2003
 
Barak Defends Plan to Assassinate Saddam: "Former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak defended an Israeli plan to assassinate Saddam Hussein in 1992, breaking his silence on an operation that was canceled after five Israeli commandos were killed during a dress rehearsal. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Attacks Decline in the Iraqi City Samarra: "After emerging as one of the worst trouble spots for U.S. forces in Iraq, the violence in Samarra tapered off this week amid raids by American troops and calls by Muslim clerics for insurgents to halt attacks that lead to civilian deaths. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Turkish court charges man in bombings: "An anti-terrorism court Friday charged a Turk with an offense amounting to treason after authorities said he acted as a link between al-Qaida and suicide bombers in attacks that killed 62 people in Istanbul last month."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



How Army Sleuths Stalked the Adviser Who Led to Hussein: "The man who led U.S. Special Operations forces to Saddam Hussein's hideaway was not on anyone's Top 55 or even Top 200 fugitive list."

In New York Times: World Special



Yes, Convoy Was Attacked, Bremer Says: "L. Paul Bremer III, the top American official in Iraq, acknowledged on Friday that a convoy he was traveling in two weeks ago had been attacked."

In New York Times: World Special



Halliburton Says It Saved U.S. Oil Money: "Halliburton officials noted that it saved taxpayers $164 million by importing most of the fuel from Turkey."

In New York Times: World Special



Baker Briefs Bush on Trip on Reducing Iraq's Debt: "Administration officials pronounce James A. Baker's trip � to France, Germany, Italy, Russia and Britain � a success."

In New York Times: World Special



Fears of Retaliation for U.S. Limits on Iraq Work: "The decision to ban certain countries from bidding on reconstruction projects may come back to haunt some American companies."

In New York Times: World Special



2 Kurdish Parties Close to Forming Unity Government: "Once they have created a single government in the Kurdish areas of the north, Kurdish officials will push for a federalist system in Iraq."

In New York Times: World Special



The Aftermath: ""It started about 3pm in Fallujah. From the time it was announced that Saddam was caught, until about 3pm, everyone was astonished. There was no reaction, just waiting, to see if it was true. There was a rumour that he was seen in Fallujah, so people went out cheering. Explosions started, people demonstrated in the streets, with lots of heavy firing till midnight, rockets, RPGs." Jo Wilding writes about the reaction of Iraqis to Saddam Hussein's capture."

In Electronic Iraq



A Look at U.S. Military Deaths in Iraq: "As of Friday, Dec. 19, 460 U.S. service members have died since the beginning of military operations in Iraq, according to the Department of Defense. Of those, 315 died as a result of hostile action and 145 died of non-hostile causes, the department said. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Saddam, Libya Announcements Boost Blair: "In less than a week, Prime Minister Tony Blair has had two big moments in the international spotlight, going public first with important good news for him and close ally President Bush. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Ex-Atty. General Would Aid Saddam Defense: "Former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark said Friday that he would be willing to provide legal counsel to Saddam Hussein if the ousted Iraqi leader requested Clark's assistance. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Ex-atty. general would aid Saddam defense: "Former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark said Friday that he would be willing to provide legal counsel to Saddam Hussein if the ousted Iraqi leader requested Clark's assistance."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Bomb demolishes Badr Brigade HQ in Baghdad: "Bomb blast in Baghdad destroys the HQ of the Badr Brigade. What will the Shi'ites do now?"

In Back to Iraq 2.0



Anti-Bush Iraq Documentary Makes the Party Circuit: "In the midst of a film industrycrackdown on digital movie piracy, filmmaker Robert Greenwaldis urging rampant, unauthorized copying of his documentarycriticizing the Bush administration's reasons for invadingIraq. (Reuters)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



War in Iraq Voted Top Story of 2003: "The "major combat" phase was over in six weeks, but the war in Iraq - from its tumultuous prelude to a still-active insurgency - was in the global spotlight throughout the year. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Democrats Press Rumsfeld for Halliburton Records: "Democratic lawmakers pressed DefenseSecretary Donald Rumsfeld on Friday for records that could shedlight on a draft audit that found Halliburton may haveovercharged the U.S. government by $61 million for fuel itshipped into Iraq. (Reuters)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Homemade Humvee armor gets a no-go from Pentagon in IraqWar.info



Mideast 'road map' architects to meet: "The architects of the "road map" to Palestinian-Israeli peace hope to meet early next year to press for its implementation, the European Union's top diplomat said Friday."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Why did the West lend so much to Iraq?: "Iraq is swamped by more than $120 billion in debt that clouds its economic future. Where did it come from? Why did so many Western democracies, including the United States, lend so much money to President Saddam Hussein? What happens now?"

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq


Friday, December 19, 2003
 
2 "Huge Explosions" in Baghdad: "BBC World is reporting "2 Huge Explosions" in Baghdad. No Links yet.
UPDATE: Not any more they're not. Nothing on Google News either. As You Were.
"

In Command Post: Irak



Israel Defense Forces' 1992 plan to assassinate Saddam Hussein: "Haaretz [ Full story »» ] reports:
Sayeret Matkal, the IDF General Staff's elite special-operations force, trained in 1992 to assassinate Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein in a daring operation that would have landed commandos in Iraq and fired sophisticated missiles at him during a funeral. The attempt was called off after five soldiers were killed during a training accident.
"

In Command Post: Irak



Arresting Children: ""Two days ago there was a demonstration after school finished, against the coalition and for Saddam. Yesterday the American army came and surrounded the whole block. They just crashed into the school, 6, 7, 8 into every classroom with their guns. They took the name of every student and matched the names to the photos they got from the day before and then arrested the students. They actually dragged them by their shirts onto the floor and out of the class." They wouldn't give their names. The children at Adnan Kheiralla Boys' School in the Amiriya district of Baghdad were still scared, still seething with rage. Jo Wilding writes about the event from Baghdad."

In Electronic Iraq



One Small Business in Iraq, Indicative of Many: "In 1953 an Iraqi man named Aziz Mikhail Zablok opened a small shoe store in Baghdad. This was no small feat, for when Aziz was 12 years old; he had begun working to help support his widowed mother of four. He eventually learned to make shoes while working for the International Shoe Company. With his brother, he opened a small shop on Rashid Street in Baghdad selling imported shoes. Eventually they began making their own in the back of the shop. Things continued to improve, and in 1958 they bought and opened a factory, then many more shops. Their business, priding itself on handmade, high quality shoes would grow into over 20 successful stores throughout Baghdad. Dahr Jamail traces the history of the family business from the coming of Saddam's regime, through the US invasion, to the present day occupation."

In Electronic Iraq



Another Home Pillaged, More Illegal Detentions: "On December 9th, at 10pm, US soldiers stormed a home in Al Ewadiyah neighborhood of Baghdad. Taharoh Muhammad Munahi Al Rufayai, a 43-year-old college professor; Leith, her brother and a retired army officer; and their elderly aunt Fahad. The soldiers forced the inhabitants to stand outside at gunpoint for five and a half hours in their bed clothes while they searched and pillaged the home, destroying much of its contents while looking for weapons and members of the resistance. Twenty soldiers picked through the home, while many more waiting outside with the family members, amidst hummers and light tanks, while helicopters circled above. Dahr Jamail writes from Baghdad."

In Electronic Iraq



Secondary School under Siege by US Forces: "On the evening of December 16th, in the Amiriya suburb of West Baghdad, the residents held a pro-Saddam Hussein demonstration. Many of the kids were throwing stones at a US Humvee Patrol as it passed by. Aside from this, it was a non-violent demonstration-no shots were fired, nobody was injured. Today, US forces from the First Armored Division returned with two large tanks, helicopters, several Bradley fighting vehicles and at least 10 hummers to seal off the Al Shahid Adnan Kherala secondary school for boys. Dahr Jamail writes from Baghdad."

In Electronic Iraq



Finally, the end for Saddam: "The capture of Saddam Hussein was a fittingly ignominious end for a cruel dictator, writes eIraq contributor Hasan Abu Nimah. But the end of Saddam does not justify the occupation, nor does it mean that the situation in Iraq will immediately improve."

In Electronic Iraq



Growing Fury and Unrest: "On the BBC, we watch footage of Americans gunning down Iraqis as they ran from the armor clad vehicles. Gunned down in the street as they tried to run away, red tracer bullets leaving laser-like trails as they flew past bodies falling upon the cement. This was told to be in Ramadi, by the BBC, then later the same footage was told to have occurred in Falluja. As usual, the truth is hard to come by, even here, unless it is witnessed personally -- or residents of an entire neighborhood or city are all telling the same story. This when, according to Iraqis converging around journalists today at the scene amidst pools of blood and pieces of US military uniforms, remnants from the night before when the fighting commenced in earnest. Pent up rage towards the occupiers was being released in the form of RPG's and machine guns firing towards the Americans. Three Hummers are reported to have been destroyed. Black scars mark where they were hit, burned into the pavement. Dahr Jamail writes from Baghdad."

In Electronic Iraq



Interview: Saddam's Capture, WMDs and the U.S. Occupation of Iraq: "Democracy Now! interviewed Electronic Iraq correspondent and former Jordanian Ambassador to the United Nations, Hassan Abu Nimah. Abu Nimah recently returned from Cairo, Egypt where he met with Arab officials from across the Middle East. In this interview he discusses Saddam's capture, WMDs and the U.S. occupation of Iraq. Format: Real Video -- Watch 128k stream | Watch 256k stream | Listen to the interview with Real Audio. The interview begins at 36:25 on the timeline in the 59 minute show."

In Electronic Iraq



Freedom of Information Act request filed on behalf of A.N.S.W.E.R.: "Yesterday, attorneys with the Partnership for Civil Justice and the National Lawyers Guild Mass Defense Committee filed a Freedom of Information Act Request (FOIA) with the FBI on behalf of the A.N.S.W.E.R. (Act Now to Stop War & End Racism) Coalition. The FOIA request follows media revelations of FBI domestic spying targeting the antiwar movement, and is part of the A.N.S.W.E.R. Coalition's Campaign to Defend the First Amendment."

In Electronic Iraq



Amnesty: "Only justice can serve the future of Iraq": ""The way this trial is handled will be crucial for the future shape of Iraq and the extent to which the rule of law will be respected," said Amnesty International. "It is important for the truth to emerge but equally important for justice to prevail.""

In Electronic Iraq



Fuel shortages continue in the north: "A severe petrol shortage in the northern city of Dahuk has seen people waiting hours at a time to get fuel, and the sprouting of a flourishing black market. Queues of vehicles have stretched for over a kilometre in recent weeks as petrol stations have run dry."

In Electronic Iraq



Title VI funding renewal imperils Middle East scholarship: ""For nearly four decades, American universities have benefited from the U.S. Department of Education programs funded under Title VI of the Higher Education Act of 1965. Title VI provides grants to nurture area and international studies centers and aims to create national resources for teaching foreign language and supporting research and training in international studies and world affairs. But these programs are under threat as neoconservatives seek to place conditions on continued funding. Title VI reauthorization already has passed the House and is expected to be taken up by the Senate in January." Electronic Iraq co-founder Laurie King-Irani, writing in the pages of In These Times, examines legislation that imperils Middle East studies in the United States"

In Electronic Iraq



Through a legal lens - the attack and occupation of Iraq: "The passage of time does not in any way alter the illegal nature of the war that has been waged by the United States and Britain in Iraq. From the moment their combined forces commenced hostilities without the express authorisation of the United Nations Security Council, the illegality of the invasion was confirmed. The Charter of the United Nations, universally accepted as legally binding, is clear and unambiguous on this issue. Shane Darcy from the Irish Centre for Human Rights reports for Electronic Iraq."

In Electronic Iraq



Searching Iraq: A Journalist's Diary: "I went to Ad Dour once, where Saddam was caught on 14 December 2003, when I was embedded with the US military as a photographer for a news agency. The 4th Infantry Division -- the Army division taking the credit for Saddam's capture -- raided a farm September 24th, 2003 on a tip that there was a large weapons cache. The Army began by raiding about 20 homes, separating the men and women and then combing through the houses. After their search of the houses turned up only a shotgun and one AK-47, they went to the farm. The highlight of the village raid was when the soldiers roughed up and then arrested some ragged old man who the locals said was 'senile'. Jamal A. Wilson describes a day spent with the US army in September 2003, searching for a weapons cache in the area Saddam was ultimately discovered."

In Electronic Iraq



Jubilation, grief, and sadness in occupied Baghdad: "The winds of change are blowing strongly across Baghdad today, literally and figuratively, on this grey, windy, chilly day. The overall mood is subdued, aside from a few small, sporadic demonstrations, namely by the Communist Party. This underscored by the fact that Saddam has been returned to the Iraqi capital, albeit under drastically different circumstances from when he left. What can be said of Iraqi reaction? It all depends on who I talk with."

In Electronic Iraq



NGOs sceptical that security will improve: "While initial bursts of celebratory gunfire and people dancing in the streets marked the capture of the former dictator, Saddam Hussein, on Saturday evening, international aid agencies remaining in Baghdad said the event was unlikely to have a positive effect on the security situation."

In Electronic Iraq



Blocking Military shipments: "Protesters plan to stop war shipments Antiwar group seeks to shut port of Oakland with picket line April 3 � Shifting protests against the war in Iraq to a new level, a San Francisco group says that it will set up a picket line Monday to block supplies being shipped to U.S. forces fighting in Iraq. The group, Direct Action to Stop the War, said will attempt to �shut down the war merchants� at the port of Oakland by urging members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union to not cross the picket line. Full story... This action will still..."

In How To Stop The War



Demand more media coverage of Iraqi civilian casualties and war damage: "I'm sure you've noticed that the U.S. TV media has provided scant coverage of the damage this war has done to the lives of civilian Iraqis. As of this writing, an estimated minimum of 876 Iraqi civilians have been killed in the war, and it's safe to say that few if any of their names or stories have been told on CNN, or any other mainstream TV news channel in the U.S. Here's what MEDIA CHALLENGE!, a coalition of anti-war groups, is urging: Every day for the next three weeks call the national news chiefs listed below (also separately call..."

In How To Stop The War



Uniting for Peace UN action: "Jeremy Brecher is spreading the word about an opportunity for emergency action at the UN: Uniting for Peace UN General Assembly Provides Crucial Opportunity for Global Peace Movement by Jeremy Brecher; April 02, 2003 By The United Nations General Assembly is hovering on the edge of calling an emergency session to challenge the US attack on Iraq. But US opposition has been fierce. The world's "other superpower" -- global public opinion as expressed in the global peace movement -- can tip the balance if it concentrates on demanding a UN General Assembly meeting to halt the war on Iraq now...."

In How To Stop The War



Librarian Strike: "This is a twist on the "no business as usual" angle. I read here that 1,900 librarians around the world expressed their opposition to the war before it happened. I don't know how that compares with the total librarian population -- which is to say I don't know if there are enough anti-war librarians to execute enough of a strike to have an impact. It wouldn't make a difference unless it caused a marked decline in availability of the service. Workers in essential services strike in Europe often to accomplish change, and I assume it's effective at least some of..."

In How To Stop The War



World Dignitary Cease-Fire Summit in Baghdad: "This idea is pretty radical, but would be highly effective if implemented, I think. It first came to mind before the war, and part of it was actually tried back then. Basically the idea is to get the Pope, and a number of other highly prominent and valued world dignitaries, to announce their intention to go to Baghdad to force a cease-fire. I say part of was already tried because there was at least a mini-movement directed toward getting the Pope to go to Baghdad back before the war started. It was probably spurred by the published plea to the..."

In How To Stop The War



Promote John Mellencamp's Protest Song "To Washington": "John Mellencamp has released a protest song called "To Washington". It's more than just a war protest song -- it's protesting the whole chain of events that led Bush and us to this point. The lyrics are below I suggest that peace activists do what they can to get this song played on their local radio stations, as well as Internet stations, record stores, and wherever else. The bigger vision would be to try and get the song to number one on the charts, and keep it there. Here are the lyrics of "To Washington" --you can listen to the..."

In How To Stop The War



Bringing PNAC to light - The Project for a New American Century: "The best strategy I have come up with to turn public opinion on this war is the idea of bringing the Project for a New American Century to the attention and focus of the mainstream American public. Even surface analysis of the PNAC shows that the war in Iraq is not about liberation for Iraqis, but control for the U.S., and military dominance in the Middle East. The news reports showing strong Iraqi resistance to the U.S. invasion provide the other piece of that puzzle. Americans in general are not in favor of global dominance for America, or a "unipolar"..."

In How To Stop The War



Welcome to HowToStopTheWar.org: "This site was created out of concern that some of the anti-war protest efforts were not having their intended effects -- namely, to influence public opinion and bring an end to the war. I'm speaking particularly of the traffic-blocking and more aggressive efforts. I truly applaud the dedication and effort of those non-violent resisters, I just feel (and I know many agree) that they are not winning people over, but instead angering and alienating many who might otherwise be open to hearing anti-war views. My hope is that HowToStopTheWar.org can become a clearinghouse of ideas for creative and achievable projects..."

In How To Stop The War



InsideVC's War Blog: "Saddam and the CIA . Details from UPI. (via Matt Welch )"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Kurds, Kirkuk, Kontrol
The NYT has an excellent article summarizing the breadth of de facto power in Kurdish hands in the north.  Among other things, it mentions that "Kurdish groups appear to be quietly nursing relations with foreign neighbors independent of Baghdad. A Turkish consulate will open in Sulaimaniya this month..."
A Turkish consulate?? 
Meanwhile, the Boston Globe describes the lead up to the council elections in Kirkuk:

In preparation for the vote... Iraqis whitewashed the building, hung up red, white, and blue bunting - and then took it down, because those are not the colors of the Iraqi flag. And when Major General Ray Odierno entered the auditorium, the delegates were instructed to stand. They dutifully rose, then sat and offered tepid applause for Odierno's opening remarks.

An AP report on Yahoo news goes into more detail on the process of the elections, themselves, with a description of the flap surrounding a group of independent delegates.  Maj. Gen. Ray Odierno, finally "said he would not decide until Sunday whether he would accept the results of the balloting or choose other members.
"When I make my decision tomorrow," he said, "everyone must abide by it." 
So....the Kurds are clearly in control, with occupation forces trying to put a good face on the intense inter-ethnic rivalry with these, uh, elections.  The same NYT article mentioned above summarizes things:  "American authorities are still unsure how to handle the problem."   We seem to be pressing ahead with the symbols of democracy (i.e., red, white and blue bunting), despite the facts on the ground.  Is it that we don't know what else to do, or are we attempting a public relations exercise, or a little of both?
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Looking for some good news...
The Christian Science Monitor recently published a "report card" on the occupation, and summarized the good news by citing "coalition officials," suggesting that crime was lower outside of Baghdad, and that those living in the north and south have "more electricity than ever."
The Washington Post adds a glimmer of hope to this assessment, describing a new approach the US military will be taking in Baghdad, involving more contact between soldiers and civilians, and changing the organization and techniques used in patrolling.
The Guardian , however, rains on the parade, reporting that "Baghdad is being carved up by armed gangs," and that there is "a total disconnection between the optimistic language of US press briefings at Saddam Hussein's old palace and the anarchic reality on the street."
I'd been wondering about that.
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Sergio Vieira de Mello
Human Rights Watch , Amnesty International , and the US Government all are backing Mr. Vieira de Mello enthusiastically.  Given his background (see BBC profile ), if anyone can take a four-month appointment with no clearly defined authority and make something happen -- he can.  Cross your fingers.
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: " UN Resolution = American business contracts
1.  From the Washington Post , re: the latest UN Resolution:

The seven-page resolution would immediately transfer legal control over Iraq's oil industry from the United Nations and Iraq to the United States and its allies. The oil proceeds would be used to finance the country's reconstruction, the costs of an Iraqi civilian administration, the completion of Iraq's disarmament and " other purposes benefiting the people of Iraq ." [Emphasis added.]

Is that like what shows up at the end of a job description -- "and other duties as necessary"? 
So what the draft is saying is that we will decide what benefits the people of Iraq.  And then when folks like Philip Carroll say that the Iraqi people will decide whether or not to stay in OPEC or not, or that the Iraqi people will decide which telecommunications company to use, American voters will be convinced of our own benefaction.  It's all for the Iraqi people.  Say, "The Iraqi People" ten times, fast.
2.  Meanwhile, the NYT reports that Paul Wolfowitz has come back from a trip from Bosnia, freshly enlightened about the benefit of taking plenty of time before holding elections after a dictatorship.  There are countless historical examples, mind you, of imperial powers (woops, did I say, "imperial"?) occupying a weaker country indefinitely, saying that they need to do it to maintain stability.  Please feel free to add examples in the comments section.
3.  From an outstanding article in Asia Times :

a) Rebuilding oil fields, potentially also exporting oil -- Halliburton
b) General infrastructure reconstruction -- Bechtel
c) Rebuilding seaports -  Stevedoring Services of America
d) Refurbishing rebuilt airports - Airlink USA
e) Contracted policing services -  Dyncorp
f) See yesterday re: satellite phone service and MCI Worldcom

Don't know what ever happened to the Iraqi United National Company for Investment and Construction (see previous post ). 
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: " Now, about that interim authority...
The U.S., Britain and Spain presented a third draft of the resolution for lifting sanctions on Iraq --although The Guardian reports the US is trying to push it through in 48 hours.  The current draft, says the Financial Times, is "close to its [the American] bottom line."  Basically, we throw some bones to the U.N., buy off Russia, and drop "the open-ended grant of authority in favor of a requirement that the United States and Britain cede power when 'an internationally recognized, representative government is established.' " (NYT)  Well, that's a relief.
Oh, and we do get to appoint our own auditors for monitoring Iraqi oil profits.  We have a strong tradition of auditing our own interests here in America.
Where, you might ask, are the Iraqis in all of this?  Well, 10,000 were on the streets of Baghdad protesting their lack of real power in the still amorphous and undefined interim authority.  And key players among the Iraqi opposition groups are saying they won't play if the so-called authority doesn't have real control over the ministries.  The Financial Times quotes Hoshyar Zebari, of the Kurdistan Democratic party, as saying that if the US doesn't empower the Iraqi political parties, they will not participate, and, instead, "seek local power 'on their own turf'," a sentiment echoed by Kasim Sahlani, head of the political bureau of the Da'awa party. 
Given the fact that the Washington Post reports a marked increase in vigilante justice in Baghdad, and yesterday's sharp spike in violence between Kurds and Arabs in the north (Boston Globe), these signs do not bode well.  We know that President Bush doesn't like basing policy on focus groups, but let's hope the US can sense a pending civil war when the signs start peeking out.
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Iran - a moderating influence?
I couldn't wait until tomorrow -- Salam Pax is back, with a note:

"I came back from the trip seriously worrying that we might become an Iran-clone. If anyone went to the streets now and decided to hold elections we will end up with something that is scarier than Khomeini�s Iran."

Houchang Chehabi , a professor of International Relations at Boston University, said in a recent lecture that the U.S. shouldn't be so worried about Iran's potential interference in Iraqi politics.  Why?  The Iranian Islamists tend to be less radical, and could act as a moderating influence on the Iraqi Shi'ites. 
Question #1:  does anyone in the DoD know this?  (Clearly, it doesn't matter if State knows about it, since they're just a bunch of intellectual whiners, anyway.)
Question #2:  if we know about it, are we complaining about Iran because we are trying to pick a fight? 
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Correction
Quick correction, thanks to Christopher Allbritton of Back In Iraq 2.0 .  According to Christopher, "Turkey has been supporting clandestine groups in Iraqi Kurdistan for years now. The various Turkomen parties ALL get a crap load of money and support from Turkey and they have been a more or less destabilizing force against the Kurds. However, I suspect Turkey will definitely step up its support in the near future..." 
Thanks, Christopher!
 
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Northern Iraq
We've been hearing about Bremer's publicity tour in Mosul, celebrating its "embryonic democracy."  It's certainly possible for the new city council there to morph into something concrete, but the current level of democracy, with  Maj. Gen. David H. Petraeus in virtually complete control, remains debatable.  A profile of Petraeus in the Washington Post quotes him as saying,  "I am the occupying power, make no mistake...," and depicts him as a veritable village khan, receiving individuals and telling them what they can and can't do.
Kirkuk is also installing a new city council, which, according to ABC News , will have 24 members elected by a body of 300 selected by the Americans.  But, it turns out, according to the Post , again, US forces are supporting the new coalition of the Kurdish PUK and KDP -- to the virtual exclusion of the non-trivial minorities of  Arabs, Assyrians and Turkmen.  The Kurds control the local police force (made up of peshmerga forces), the television station, and the new city council.  And you may have heard the recent reports that the Kurds are offering oil deals to a number of major oil companies.
Given the incredible tensions existing now between local Arabs and Kurds, and the Turkish discomfort with the prospect of Kurdish autonomy, I would venture to say we could be looking at a powder keg.  For example, if we manage to keep Turkey from invading, as we have so far, we may not be able to prevent it from supporting clandestine groups among the ethnic minorities. 
"



Iraqi Mobile Phone system still on hold in IraqWar.info



Saddam's men worked for the CPA in IraqWar.info



Post-war procedures for US troops in Iraq being discussed. in IraqWar.info



Atta Trained in Baghdad in IraqWar.info

 
2 "Huge Explosions" in Baghdad: "BBC World is reporting "2 Huge Explosions" in Baghdad. No Links yet.
UPDATE: Not any more they're not. Nothing on Google News either. As You Were.
"

In Command Post: Irak



Israel Defense Forces' 1992 plan to assassinate Saddam Hussein: "Haaretz [ Full story »» ] reports:
Sayeret Matkal, the IDF General Staff's elite special-operations force, trained in 1992 to assassinate Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein in a daring operation that would have landed commandos in Iraq and fired sophisticated missiles at him during a funeral. The attempt was called off after five soldiers were killed during a training accident.
"

In Command Post: Irak



Arresting Children: ""Two days ago there was a demonstration after school finished, against the coalition and for Saddam. Yesterday the American army came and surrounded the whole block. They just crashed into the school, 6, 7, 8 into every classroom with their guns. They took the name of every student and matched the names to the photos they got from the day before and then arrested the students. They actually dragged them by their shirts onto the floor and out of the class." They wouldn't give their names. The children at Adnan Kheiralla Boys' School in the Amiriya district of Baghdad were still scared, still seething with rage. Jo Wilding writes about the event from Baghdad."

In Electronic Iraq



One Small Business in Iraq, Indicative of Many: "In 1953 an Iraqi man named Aziz Mikhail Zablok opened a small shoe store in Baghdad. This was no small feat, for when Aziz was 12 years old; he had begun working to help support his widowed mother of four. He eventually learned to make shoes while working for the International Shoe Company. With his brother, he opened a small shop on Rashid Street in Baghdad selling imported shoes. Eventually they began making their own in the back of the shop. Things continued to improve, and in 1958 they bought and opened a factory, then many more shops. Their business, priding itself on handmade, high quality shoes would grow into over 20 successful stores throughout Baghdad. Dahr Jamail traces the history of the family business from the coming of Saddam's regime, through the US invasion, to the present day occupation."

In Electronic Iraq



Another Home Pillaged, More Illegal Detentions: "On December 9th, at 10pm, US soldiers stormed a home in Al Ewadiyah neighborhood of Baghdad. Taharoh Muhammad Munahi Al Rufayai, a 43-year-old college professor; Leith, her brother and a retired army officer; and their elderly aunt Fahad. The soldiers forced the inhabitants to stand outside at gunpoint for five and a half hours in their bed clothes while they searched and pillaged the home, destroying much of its contents while looking for weapons and members of the resistance. Twenty soldiers picked through the home, while many more waiting outside with the family members, amidst hummers and light tanks, while helicopters circled above. Dahr Jamail writes from Baghdad."

In Electronic Iraq



Secondary School under Siege by US Forces: "On the evening of December 16th, in the Amiriya suburb of West Baghdad, the residents held a pro-Saddam Hussein demonstration. Many of the kids were throwing stones at a US Humvee Patrol as it passed by. Aside from this, it was a non-violent demonstration-no shots were fired, nobody was injured. Today, US forces from the First Armored Division returned with two large tanks, helicopters, several Bradley fighting vehicles and at least 10 hummers to seal off the Al Shahid Adnan Kherala secondary school for boys. Dahr Jamail writes from Baghdad."

In Electronic Iraq



Finally, the end for Saddam: "The capture of Saddam Hussein was a fittingly ignominious end for a cruel dictator, writes eIraq contributor Hasan Abu Nimah. But the end of Saddam does not justify the occupation, nor does it mean that the situation in Iraq will immediately improve."

In Electronic Iraq



Growing Fury and Unrest: "On the BBC, we watch footage of Americans gunning down Iraqis as they ran from the armor clad vehicles. Gunned down in the street as they tried to run away, red tracer bullets leaving laser-like trails as they flew past bodies falling upon the cement. This was told to be in Ramadi, by the BBC, then later the same footage was told to have occurred in Falluja. As usual, the truth is hard to come by, even here, unless it is witnessed personally -- or residents of an entire neighborhood or city are all telling the same story. This when, according to Iraqis converging around journalists today at the scene amidst pools of blood and pieces of US military uniforms, remnants from the night before when the fighting commenced in earnest. Pent up rage towards the occupiers was being released in the form of RPG's and machine guns firing towards the Americans. Three Hummers are reported to have been destroyed. Black scars mark where they were hit, burned into the pavement. Dahr Jamail writes from Baghdad."

In Electronic Iraq



Interview: Saddam's Capture, WMDs and the U.S. Occupation of Iraq: "Democracy Now! interviewed Electronic Iraq correspondent and former Jordanian Ambassador to the United Nations, Hassan Abu Nimah. Abu Nimah recently returned from Cairo, Egypt where he met with Arab officials from across the Middle East. In this interview he discusses Saddam's capture, WMDs and the U.S. occupation of Iraq. Format: Real Video -- Watch 128k stream | Watch 256k stream | Listen to the interview with Real Audio. The interview begins at 36:25 on the timeline in the 59 minute show."

In Electronic Iraq



Freedom of Information Act request filed on behalf of A.N.S.W.E.R.: "Yesterday, attorneys with the Partnership for Civil Justice and the National Lawyers Guild Mass Defense Committee filed a Freedom of Information Act Request (FOIA) with the FBI on behalf of the A.N.S.W.E.R. (Act Now to Stop War & End Racism) Coalition. The FOIA request follows media revelations of FBI domestic spying targeting the antiwar movement, and is part of the A.N.S.W.E.R. Coalition's Campaign to Defend the First Amendment."

In Electronic Iraq



Amnesty: "Only justice can serve the future of Iraq": ""The way this trial is handled will be crucial for the future shape of Iraq and the extent to which the rule of law will be respected," said Amnesty International. "It is important for the truth to emerge but equally important for justice to prevail.""

In Electronic Iraq



Fuel shortages continue in the north: "A severe petrol shortage in the northern city of Dahuk has seen people waiting hours at a time to get fuel, and the sprouting of a flourishing black market. Queues of vehicles have stretched for over a kilometre in recent weeks as petrol stations have run dry."

In Electronic Iraq



Title VI funding renewal imperils Middle East scholarship: ""For nearly four decades, American universities have benefited from the U.S. Department of Education programs funded under Title VI of the Higher Education Act of 1965. Title VI provides grants to nurture area and international studies centers and aims to create national resources for teaching foreign language and supporting research and training in international studies and world affairs. But these programs are under threat as neoconservatives seek to place conditions on continued funding. Title VI reauthorization already has passed the House and is expected to be taken up by the Senate in January." Electronic Iraq co-founder Laurie King-Irani, writing in the pages of In These Times, examines legislation that imperils Middle East studies in the United States"

In Electronic Iraq



Through a legal lens - the attack and occupation of Iraq: "The passage of time does not in any way alter the illegal nature of the war that has been waged by the United States and Britain in Iraq. From the moment their combined forces commenced hostilities without the express authorisation of the United Nations Security Council, the illegality of the invasion was confirmed. The Charter of the United Nations, universally accepted as legally binding, is clear and unambiguous on this issue. Shane Darcy from the Irish Centre for Human Rights reports for Electronic Iraq."

In Electronic Iraq



Searching Iraq: A Journalist's Diary: "I went to Ad Dour once, where Saddam was caught on 14 December 2003, when I was embedded with the US military as a photographer for a news agency. The 4th Infantry Division -- the Army division taking the credit for Saddam's capture -- raided a farm September 24th, 2003 on a tip that there was a large weapons cache. The Army began by raiding about 20 homes, separating the men and women and then combing through the houses. After their search of the houses turned up only a shotgun and one AK-47, they went to the farm. The highlight of the village raid was when the soldiers roughed up and then arrested some ragged old man who the locals said was 'senile'. Jamal A. Wilson describes a day spent with the US army in September 2003, searching for a weapons cache in the area Saddam was ultimately discovered."

In Electronic Iraq



Jubilation, grief, and sadness in occupied Baghdad: "The winds of change are blowing strongly across Baghdad today, literally and figuratively, on this grey, windy, chilly day. The overall mood is subdued, aside from a few small, sporadic demonstrations, namely by the Communist Party. This underscored by the fact that Saddam has been returned to the Iraqi capital, albeit under drastically different circumstances from when he left. What can be said of Iraqi reaction? It all depends on who I talk with."

In Electronic Iraq



NGOs sceptical that security will improve: "While initial bursts of celebratory gunfire and people dancing in the streets marked the capture of the former dictator, Saddam Hussein, on Saturday evening, international aid agencies remaining in Baghdad said the event was unlikely to have a positive effect on the security situation."

In Electronic Iraq



Blocking Military shipments: "Protesters plan to stop war shipments Antiwar group seeks to shut port of Oakland with picket line April 3 � Shifting protests against the war in Iraq to a new level, a San Francisco group says that it will set up a picket line Monday to block supplies being shipped to U.S. forces fighting in Iraq. The group, Direct Action to Stop the War, said will attempt to �shut down the war merchants� at the port of Oakland by urging members of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union to not cross the picket line. Full story... This action will still..."

In How To Stop The War



Demand more media coverage of Iraqi civilian casualties and war damage: "I'm sure you've noticed that the U.S. TV media has provided scant coverage of the damage this war has done to the lives of civilian Iraqis. As of this writing, an estimated minimum of 876 Iraqi civilians have been killed in the war, and it's safe to say that few if any of their names or stories have been told on CNN, or any other mainstream TV news channel in the U.S. Here's what MEDIA CHALLENGE!, a coalition of anti-war groups, is urging: Every day for the next three weeks call the national news chiefs listed below (also separately call..."

In How To Stop The War



Uniting for Peace UN action: "Jeremy Brecher is spreading the word about an opportunity for emergency action at the UN: Uniting for Peace UN General Assembly Provides Crucial Opportunity for Global Peace Movement by Jeremy Brecher; April 02, 2003 By The United Nations General Assembly is hovering on the edge of calling an emergency session to challenge the US attack on Iraq. But US opposition has been fierce. The world's "other superpower" -- global public opinion as expressed in the global peace movement -- can tip the balance if it concentrates on demanding a UN General Assembly meeting to halt the war on Iraq now...."

In How To Stop The War



Librarian Strike: "This is a twist on the "no business as usual" angle. I read here that 1,900 librarians around the world expressed their opposition to the war before it happened. I don't know how that compares with the total librarian population -- which is to say I don't know if there are enough anti-war librarians to execute enough of a strike to have an impact. It wouldn't make a difference unless it caused a marked decline in availability of the service. Workers in essential services strike in Europe often to accomplish change, and I assume it's effective at least some of..."

In How To Stop The War



World Dignitary Cease-Fire Summit in Baghdad: "This idea is pretty radical, but would be highly effective if implemented, I think. It first came to mind before the war, and part of it was actually tried back then. Basically the idea is to get the Pope, and a number of other highly prominent and valued world dignitaries, to announce their intention to go to Baghdad to force a cease-fire. I say part of was already tried because there was at least a mini-movement directed toward getting the Pope to go to Baghdad back before the war started. It was probably spurred by the published plea to the..."

In How To Stop The War



Promote John Mellencamp's Protest Song "To Washington": "John Mellencamp has released a protest song called "To Washington". It's more than just a war protest song -- it's protesting the whole chain of events that led Bush and us to this point. The lyrics are below I suggest that peace activists do what they can to get this song played on their local radio stations, as well as Internet stations, record stores, and wherever else. The bigger vision would be to try and get the song to number one on the charts, and keep it there. Here are the lyrics of "To Washington" --you can listen to the..."

In How To Stop The War



Bringing PNAC to light - The Project for a New American Century: "The best strategy I have come up with to turn public opinion on this war is the idea of bringing the Project for a New American Century to the attention and focus of the mainstream American public. Even surface analysis of the PNAC shows that the war in Iraq is not about liberation for Iraqis, but control for the U.S., and military dominance in the Middle East. The news reports showing strong Iraqi resistance to the U.S. invasion provide the other piece of that puzzle. Americans in general are not in favor of global dominance for America, or a "unipolar"..."

In How To Stop The War



Welcome to HowToStopTheWar.org: "This site was created out of concern that some of the anti-war protest efforts were not having their intended effects -- namely, to influence public opinion and bring an end to the war. I'm speaking particularly of the traffic-blocking and more aggressive efforts. I truly applaud the dedication and effort of those non-violent resisters, I just feel (and I know many agree) that they are not winning people over, but instead angering and alienating many who might otherwise be open to hearing anti-war views. My hope is that HowToStopTheWar.org can become a clearinghouse of ideas for creative and achievable projects..."

In How To Stop The War



InsideVC's War Blog: "Saddam and the CIA . Details from UPI. (via Matt Welch )"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Kurds, Kirkuk, Kontrol
The NYT has an excellent article summarizing the breadth of de facto power in Kurdish hands in the north.  Among other things, it mentions that "Kurdish groups appear to be quietly nursing relations with foreign neighbors independent of Baghdad. A Turkish consulate will open in Sulaimaniya this month..."
A Turkish consulate?? 
Meanwhile, the Boston Globe describes the lead up to the council elections in Kirkuk:

In preparation for the vote... Iraqis whitewashed the building, hung up red, white, and blue bunting - and then took it down, because those are not the colors of the Iraqi flag. And when Major General Ray Odierno entered the auditorium, the delegates were instructed to stand. They dutifully rose, then sat and offered tepid applause for Odierno's opening remarks.

An AP report on Yahoo news goes into more detail on the process of the elections, themselves, with a description of the flap surrounding a group of independent delegates.  Maj. Gen. Ray Odierno, finally "said he would not decide until Sunday whether he would accept the results of the balloting or choose other members.
"When I make my decision tomorrow," he said, "everyone must abide by it." 
So....the Kurds are clearly in control, with occupation forces trying to put a good face on the intense inter-ethnic rivalry with these, uh, elections.  The same NYT article mentioned above summarizes things:  "American authorities are still unsure how to handle the problem."   We seem to be pressing ahead with the symbols of democracy (i.e., red, white and blue bunting), despite the facts on the ground.  Is it that we don't know what else to do, or are we attempting a public relations exercise, or a little of both?
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Looking for some good news...
The Christian Science Monitor recently published a "report card" on the occupation, and summarized the good news by citing "coalition officials," suggesting that crime was lower outside of Baghdad, and that those living in the north and south have "more electricity than ever."
The Washington Post adds a glimmer of hope to this assessment, describing a new approach the US military will be taking in Baghdad, involving more contact between soldiers and civilians, and changing the organization and techniques used in patrolling.
The Guardian , however, rains on the parade, reporting that "Baghdad is being carved up by armed gangs," and that there is "a total disconnection between the optimistic language of US press briefings at Saddam Hussein's old palace and the anarchic reality on the street."
I'd been wondering about that.
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Sergio Vieira de Mello
Human Rights Watch , Amnesty International , and the US Government all are backing Mr. Vieira de Mello enthusiastically.  Given his background (see BBC profile ), if anyone can take a four-month appointment with no clearly defined authority and make something happen -- he can.  Cross your fingers.
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: " UN Resolution = American business contracts
1.  From the Washington Post , re: the latest UN Resolution:

The seven-page resolution would immediately transfer legal control over Iraq's oil industry from the United Nations and Iraq to the United States and its allies. The oil proceeds would be used to finance the country's reconstruction, the costs of an Iraqi civilian administration, the completion of Iraq's disarmament and " other purposes benefiting the people of Iraq ." [Emphasis added.]

Is that like what shows up at the end of a job description -- "and other duties as necessary"? 
So what the draft is saying is that we will decide what benefits the people of Iraq.  And then when folks like Philip Carroll say that the Iraqi people will decide whether or not to stay in OPEC or not, or that the Iraqi people will decide which telecommunications company to use, American voters will be convinced of our own benefaction.  It's all for the Iraqi people.  Say, "The Iraqi People" ten times, fast.
2.  Meanwhile, the NYT reports that Paul Wolfowitz has come back from a trip from Bosnia, freshly enlightened about the benefit of taking plenty of time before holding elections after a dictatorship.  There are countless historical examples, mind you, of imperial powers (woops, did I say, "imperial"?) occupying a weaker country indefinitely, saying that they need to do it to maintain stability.  Please feel free to add examples in the comments section.
3.  From an outstanding article in Asia Times :

a) Rebuilding oil fields, potentially also exporting oil -- Halliburton
b) General infrastructure reconstruction -- Bechtel
c) Rebuilding seaports -  Stevedoring Services of America
d) Refurbishing rebuilt airports - Airlink USA
e) Contracted policing services -  Dyncorp
f) See yesterday re: satellite phone service and MCI Worldcom

Don't know what ever happened to the Iraqi United National Company for Investment and Construction (see previous post ). 
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: " Now, about that interim authority...
The U.S., Britain and Spain presented a third draft of the resolution for lifting sanctions on Iraq --although The Guardian reports the US is trying to push it through in 48 hours.  The current draft, says the Financial Times, is "close to its [the American] bottom line."  Basically, we throw some bones to the U.N., buy off Russia, and drop "the open-ended grant of authority in favor of a requirement that the United States and Britain cede power when 'an internationally recognized, representative government is established.' " (NYT)  Well, that's a relief.
Oh, and we do get to appoint our own auditors for monitoring Iraqi oil profits.  We have a strong tradition of auditing our own interests here in America.
Where, you might ask, are the Iraqis in all of this?  Well, 10,000 were on the streets of Baghdad protesting their lack of real power in the still amorphous and undefined interim authority.  And key players among the Iraqi opposition groups are saying they won't play if the so-called authority doesn't have real control over the ministries.  The Financial Times quotes Hoshyar Zebari, of the Kurdistan Democratic party, as saying that if the US doesn't empower the Iraqi political parties, they will not participate, and, instead, "seek local power 'on their own turf'," a sentiment echoed by Kasim Sahlani, head of the political bureau of the Da'awa party. 
Given the fact that the Washington Post reports a marked increase in vigilante justice in Baghdad, and yesterday's sharp spike in violence between Kurds and Arabs in the north (Boston Globe), these signs do not bode well.  We know that President Bush doesn't like basing policy on focus groups, but let's hope the US can sense a pending civil war when the signs start peeking out.
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Iran - a moderating influence?
I couldn't wait until tomorrow -- Salam Pax is back, with a note:

"I came back from the trip seriously worrying that we might become an Iran-clone. If anyone went to the streets now and decided to hold elections we will end up with something that is scarier than Khomeini�s Iran."

Houchang Chehabi , a professor of International Relations at Boston University, said in a recent lecture that the U.S. shouldn't be so worried about Iran's potential interference in Iraqi politics.  Why?  The Iranian Islamists tend to be less radical, and could act as a moderating influence on the Iraqi Shi'ites. 
Question #1:  does anyone in the DoD know this?  (Clearly, it doesn't matter if State knows about it, since they're just a bunch of intellectual whiners, anyway.)
Question #2:  if we know about it, are we complaining about Iran because we are trying to pick a fight? 
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Correction
Quick correction, thanks to Christopher Allbritton of Back In Iraq 2.0 .  According to Christopher, "Turkey has been supporting clandestine groups in Iraqi Kurdistan for years now. The various Turkomen parties ALL get a crap load of money and support from Turkey and they have been a more or less destabilizing force against the Kurds. However, I suspect Turkey will definitely step up its support in the near future..." 
Thanks, Christopher!
 
"



Iraq Democracy Watch: "Northern Iraq
We've been hearing about Bremer's publicity tour in Mosul, celebrating its "embryonic democracy."  It's certainly possible for the new city council there to morph into something concrete, but the current level of democracy, with  Maj. Gen. David H. Petraeus in virtually complete control, remains debatable.  A profile of Petraeus in the Washington Post quotes him as saying,  "I am the occupying power, make no mistake...," and depicts him as a veritable village khan, receiving individuals and telling them what they can and can't do.
Kirkuk is also installing a new city council, which, according to ABC News , will have 24 members elected by a body of 300 selected by the Americans.  But, it turns out, according to the Post , again, US forces are supporting the new coalition of the Kurdish PUK and KDP -- to the virtual exclusion of the non-trivial minorities of  Arabs, Assyrians and Turkmen.  The Kurds control the local police force (made up of peshmerga forces), the television station, and the new city council.  And you may have heard the recent reports that the Kurds are offering oil deals to a number of major oil companies.
Given the incredible tensions existing now between local Arabs and Kurds, and the Turkish discomfort with the prospect of Kurdish autonomy, I would venture to say we could be looking at a powder keg.  For example, if we manage to keep Turkey from invading, as we have so far, we may not be able to prevent it from supporting clandestine groups among the ethnic minorities. 
"



Iraqi Mobile Phone system still on hold in IraqWar.info



Saddam's men worked for the CPA in IraqWar.info



Post-war procedures for US troops in Iraq being discussed. in IraqWar.info



Atta Trained in Baghdad in IraqWar.info

 
Bremer escaped Iraq ambush two weeks ago: "U.S. administrator L. Paul Bremer escaped a rebel ambush on his convoy two weeks ago, authorities said Friday. An explosion, meanwhile, struck the office of a major Shiite party, killing an Iraqi woman."

In JuneauEmpire.com: Associated Press



Boat with drugs, ties to al-Qaida seized: "The U.S. Navy has seized a boat in the Persian Gulf carrying two tons of hashish and four people tied to the al-Qaida terrorist network, the military said Friday."

In JuneauEmpire.com: Associated Press



Revised WTC Freedom Tower design unveiled: "A new design for the Freedom Tower at the World Trade Center site slopes gracefully into a spire rising 1,776 feet, echoing the Statue of Liberty, images released Friday show."

In JuneauEmpire.com: Associated Press

 
ISRAELI PLAN THREATENS ROAD MAP
The Mirror: "ISRAELI Prime Minister Ariel Sharon yesterday threatened to ditch the peace "road map" and impose a separation settlement on the Palestinians."
 
Iraq war news
Bremer Says He Survives Iraq Assassination Bid: "Iraq's U.S. administrator PaulBremer said Friday he had escaped an assassination attempt inBaghdad in early December. (Reuters)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Saddam's Daughter Cried at Dad's Capture: "Saddam Hussein's eldest daughter said she broke down and cried when she heard news of her father's capture, adding in an interview that TV images of a disheveled Saddam beamed the across the world were meant to "break the spirit of Arabs." (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Saddam's daughter cried at dad's capture: "Saddam Hussein's eldest daughter said she broke down and cried when she heard news of her father's capture, adding in an interview that TV images of a disheveled Saddam beamed the across the world were meant to "break the spirit of Arabs.""

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Truck blast wounds two soldiers in Iraq: "A roadside bomb exploded near a U.S. military truck outside Baghdad on Friday, wounding two U.S. soldiers, the military said, while an Iraqi woman died as another blast hit the office of a major Shiite party."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



U.S. warns Israel on imposing solution: "The United States warned Israel against imposing a solution if peace efforts remain stalled, and the Palestinians called Ariel Sharon's ultimatum unacceptable."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Saddam's arrest brings humiliation debate: "Was he an Arab hero or a dictator? This is the question being debated in newspapers in the Middle East and by Arab intellectuals faced with the image of a bearded, bedraggled Saddam Hussein in the hands of American captors."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Truck Blast Kills 2 U.S. Soldiers in Iraq: "A U.S. military tanker truck exploded on a road outside Baghdad on Friday, and witnesses said it killed two U.S. soldiers and wounded one. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Saddam's Arrest Brings Humiliation Debate: "Was he an Arab hero or a dictator? This is the question being debated in newspapers in the Middle East and by Arab intellectuals faced with the image of a bearded, bedraggled Saddam Hussein in the hands of American captors. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Blast Hits Office of Iraq's Shiite Party: "A predawn explosion Friday at an office belonging to Iraq's major Shiite party killed one Iraqi woman and wounded five others, witnesses said. It was the second attack this week on the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution Party. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Truck blast kills 2 U.S. soldiers in Iraq: "A U.S. military tanker truck exploded on a road outside Baghdad on Friday, and witnesses said it killed two U.S. soldiers and wounded one."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



One killed in explosion at Shiite building in CNN - War in Iraq



Officials: WMD chief may quit in CNN - War in Iraq



Saddam's daughter wants fair trial in CNN - War in Iraq



Witnesses: Iraq Tanker blast kills two: "A U.S. military tanker truck exploded on a road outside Baghdad on Friday, and witnesses said two U.S. soldiers were killed and another was wounded."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Sharon probes removing some settlements: "In an extraordinary shift of Israeli politics, Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, the leading patron of Jewish settlements in the West Bank and Gaza, is talking about dismantling some of them."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Turkey captures man suspected in bombings: "Turkish authorities have captured a Turkish man suspected of planning last month's deadly truck bombings in Istanbul after meeting with Osama bin Laden, an intelligence official said Friday."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Blast hits office of Iraq's Shiite party: "A predawn explosion Friday at an office belonging to Iraq's major Shiite party killed one Iraqi woman and wounded five others, witnesses said. It was the second attack this week on the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution Party."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Reserve Unit awaits OK to use steel armor: "Fearing roadside bombs and sniper bullets, members of the Army Reserves' 428th Transportation Co. turned to a local steel fabricator to fashion extra armor for their 5-ton trucks and Humvees before beginning their journey to Iraq earlier this month."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Woman killed in Baghdad bomb attack: "An explosion at an office belonging to Iraq's major Shiite party has killed one Iraqi woman and wounded five others in Baghdad."

In Ananova: War In Iraq



Witnesses: Iraq Tanker Blast Kills Two: "A U.S. military tanker truck exploded on a road outside Baghdad on Friday, and witnesses said two U.S. soldiers were killed and another was wounded. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Blast Hits Office of Iraq's Shiite Party: "Rebels killed a U.S. soldier in the first fatal ambush for the U.S. military since the capture of Saddam Hussein last weekend. The violence continued Friday, when an explosion at office belonging to Iraq's major Shiite party killed one Iraqi woman and wounded five others, witnesses said. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



US to pour more troops into Iraq; Russia to consider cutting Iraq's crushing debt: "The United States said it will pour more troops into Iraq after another US soldier died there in a roadside ambush, and Russia agreed to consider reducing Iraq's crippling debt. (AFP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



U.N. to Meet With Iraq Council, Coalition: "Secretary-General Kofi Annan on Thursday called for a Jan. 15 meeting of the key players in Iraq to pin down what role they want the United Nations to play as the country moves from U.S. occupation to a democratically elected government. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Blast hits office of Iraq's Shiite party: "Rebels killed a U.S. soldier in the first fatal ambush for the U.S. military since the capture of Saddam Hussein last weekend. The violence continued Friday, when an explosion at office belonging to Iraq's major Shiite party killed one Iraqi woman and wounded five others, witnesses said."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Reserve Unit Awaits OK to Use Steel Armor: "Fearing roadside bombs and sniper bullets, members of the Army Reserves' 428th Transportation Co. turned to a local steel fabricator to fashion extra armor for their 5-ton trucks and Humvees before beginning their journey to Iraq earlier this month. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



AP: European Militant Network Shut Down: "Authorities in Europe have shut down a network that recruited at least 200 Islamic militants to carry out attacks on U.S.-led forces in Iraq, Italian investigators told The Associated Press. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Explosion Rocks Office of Iraq Shi'ite Party: "A blast ripped through a housebelonging to Iraq's main Shi'ite Muslim political group earlyon Friday, killing at least one person and injuring seven,witnesses said. (Reuters)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



US to pour more troops into Iraq; Russia to consider cutting Iraq's crushing debt: "The United States said it will pour more troops into Iraq after another US soldier died there in a roadside ambush, and Russia agreed to consider reducing Iraq's crippling debt. (AFP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



U.S. warns Israel on imposing settlement: "The Bush administration is warning Israel it will oppose any effort by its longtime ally to simply impose a Mideast settlement, saying a joint Israeli-Palestinian process remains the best chance for peace."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



U.S. says catching bin Laden difficult: "Al-Qaida suspects are being interrogated. Afghan and Pakistani villagers are being courted. Troops and unmanned aircraft are poised to strike. But finding Osama bin Laden remains enormously difficult, much more so than capturing Saddam Hussein, say American intelligence officials, lawmakers and analysts."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq


Thursday, December 18, 2003
 
Iraq war news
Fuel Tanker Explodes, Unnerving a Tense City: "A powerful explosion killed at least 13 people and injured 22, when a truck collided with a bus at an intersection in western Baghdad."

In New York Times: World Special



Remember 'Weapons of Mass Destruction'? For Bush, They Are a Nonissue: "President Bush suggested in an interview that he no longer saw much distinction between possessing banned weapons and pursuing weapons programs."

In New York Times: World Special



Iranians, Once Attacked by Hussein, Are Elated by His Capture: "After Saddam Hussein's capture, calls for revenge coursed through Iran, where anger still blazes over an eight-year war with Iraq in the 1980's."

In New York Times: World Special



Victims of Gas Say Swift Death for Hussein Would Be Too Merciful: "In the Kurdish village of Halabja, the survivors of aerial gas attacks are debating how the hand of justice should guide Saddam Hussein."

In New York Times: World Special



Italy to Reduce Iraq's Debt: "Iraq has an estimated $120 billion of debt, of which about $1.7 billion is owed to Italy."

In New York Times: World Special



No "smoking gun" to convict Saddam Hussein yet, say Iraqi experts: "Iraqi legal experts warned of the huge difficulties ahead in finding decisive evidence of Saddam Hussein's guilt in crimes committed by his regime in Iraq. (AFP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Americans advised on leaving Saudi Arabia: "Nonessential American diplomats and the families of all U.S. officials in Saudi Arabia should leave, the State Department said Wednesday, stepping up its warnings about risks in the country."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Saddam's Last Stand: "What was it like in that hole where Saddam Hussein spent his last moments as a free man? Scott Pelley takes you to the site where Saddam was found and talks to some of the people behind his dramatic capture."

In CBS News: Iraq Crisis



Baker Gets Support on Iraq From Italy: "President Bush's envoy to Iraq received support Wednesday from Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi for a plan to relieve Baghdad's huge debt burden, adding another European nation to the list supporting the U.S. goal. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



Lawmakers Urge Iraq Relations With Israel: "The Bush administration should try to ensure that the next Iraqi government has diplomatic relations with Israel, two U.S. lawmakers said Wednesday while visiting the Jewish state. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



U.S. Hunts for Militants North of Baghdad: "Using sledgehammers, crowbars, explosives and armored vehicles, U.S. forces smashed down the gates of homes and the doors of workshops and junkyards Wednesday to attack the Iraqi resistance that has persisted despite the capture of Saddam Hussein. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



U.S. Troops Kill Three Attackers, Swoop on Iraq Town: "U.S. forces killed three attackers andthousands of soldiers swooped on a town in a major crackdown onWednesday as violence and instability gripped Iraq in the wakeof Saddam Hussein's capture. (Reuters)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



ADL poll rates U.S. attitudes on Israel: "Some 43 percent of Americans believe Israel is a threat to world peace, according to a poll presented Wednesday by a Jewish group, but many more are concerned about North Korea, Iraq and Iran."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Baker gets support on Iraq from Italy: "President Bush's envoy to Iraq received support Wednesday from Italian Premier Silvio Berlusconi for a plan to relieve Baghdad's huge debt burden, adding another European nation to the list supporting the U.S. goal."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



Lawmakers urge Iraq relations with Israel: "The Bush administration should try to ensure that the next Iraqi government has diplomatic relations with Israel, two U.S. lawmakers said Wednesday while visiting the Jewish state."

In Seattle Post-Intelligencer: War on Iraq



TASK FORCE �ALL AMERICAN� CAPTURES FINANCIER, TRAINS ICDC, AND CONDUCTS CIVIL AF in CENTCOM: News Release



Lawmakers Urge Iraq Relations With Israel: "The Bush administration should try to ensure that the next Iraqi government has diplomatic relations with Israel, two U.S. lawmakers said Wednesday while visiting the Jewish state. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



U.S. Troops Kill Three in Major Anti-Guerrilla Drive: "U.S. forces killed three attackers andthousands of soldiers swooped on a town in a major crackdown onWednesday as violence and instability gripped Iraq in the wakeof Saddam Hussein's capture. (Reuters)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq



A Daily Look at U.S. Deaths in Iraq: "As of Wednesday, Dec. 17, 457 U.S. service members have died since the beginning of military operations in Iraq, according to the Department of Defense. Of those, 313 died as a result of hostile action and 144 died of non-hostile causes, the department said. (AP)"

In Yahoo! News: War with Iraq

 

 
   
  This page is powered by Blogger, the easy way to update your web site.  

Home  |  Archives  

Rate Me on BlogHop.com!
the best pretty good okay pretty bad the worst help?